All About LSD

LSD is one of the most potent, mood-changing chemicals. It is manufactured from lysergic acid, which is found in the ergot fungus that grows on rye and other grains.

It is produced in crystal form in illegal laboratories, mainly in the United States. These crystals are converted to a liquid for distribution. It is odorless, colorless, and has a slightly bitter taste.

Known as “acid” and by many other names, LSD is sold on the street in small tablets (“microdots”), capsules or gelatin squares (“window panes”). It is sometimes added to absorbent paper, which is then divided into small squares decorated with designs or cartoon characters (“loony toons”). Occasionally it is sold in liquid form. But no matter what form it comes in, LSD leads the user to the same place—a serious disconnection from reality.

LSD users call an LSD experience a “trip,” typically lasting twelve hours or so. When things go wrong, which often happens, it is called a “bad trip,” another name for a living hell.

LSD is a type of psychedelic drug that can lead to hallucinations. It’s also called acid. LSD alters a person’s ability to think and feel. It can cause changes in sensation and emotions.

In its pure state, LSD is a white, odorless powder. It’s often sold in liquid form or as tablets or capsules. It’s often put on absorbent paper. This paper is then cut into small, decorated squares. Each square is one dose.

This product is very powerful. Small amounts can cause strong effects. These effects are hard to predict. They often start 30 to 90 minutes after taking the drug. They are strongest 3 to 5 hours later. They can last for up to 12 hours.

Is LSD medicinal?

Yes. Fully legal research programs in the mid-20th century that involved tens of thousands of patients found that carefully monitored and controlled use of this product may be beneficial for many psychiatric disorders, personal and spiritual development, and creative enhancement for healthy people.

However, after this product was banned in 1970, clinical research to evaluate its medical safety and efficacy was effectively halted until the late 90s and early 2000s.